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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  February 27, 2024 5:30am-6:01am GMT

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�*gaps in boeing's safety plan' — a us government report raises serious concerns over the plane maker's safety management. inflation falls for the third month in a row injapan to the central bank's 2% target. and steady gains for women in leadership. we un—pick the gender balance at the top of the uk's biggest companies. hello, i'm sally bundock with the top business stories, starting here in the uk where there's a warning for the chancellor, jeremy hunt, over possible tax cuts that could be part of next week's spring budget. the institute for fiscal studies — a leading economic think tank — says mr hunt should resist announcing tax cuts if he can't show how
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he will pay for them — calling the case for cutting taxes weak. the chancellor faces continued pressure from within the conservative party to cut taxes in what is likely to be the final budget before the next general election. let's unpack this withjoshua mahony — chief market analyst at scope markets. good morning to you. no surprise at all that there is pressure and speculation ahead of next week budget, but what you make of what the institute for fiscal studies is warning? this actually comes in line to something we've heard from the imf for around two weeks ago where what they similarly warned against any sort of significant cut in terms of taxes. of course, back in autumn, we saw that headline announcement that they were going to cut 2% of the national insurance rate and coming at a time when they were under pressure in the polls, they would love to be able to do something similar in terms of a
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cut on something like income tax or the like. they have been afforded some wiggle room with the potential of £10 billion less borrowing for this year but that takes it down to 113 billion over the course of this year. that is still double where things were pre—pandemic and really, the question mark here is where is the rest of the money going to come from if we are going to see significant tax cuts? already we are seeing local governments really under pressure and it is going to have to be more cuts from the same areas because of because we have the likes of the nhs and the schools in defence that already have their funding ring—fenced to an extent. it really is the imf said, this is a case of also managing to maintain the high quality of service, so really at the moment it is a question mark of whether they are able to forgo that to bring some potentially vote winning tax cuts over the near term. vote winning tax cuts over the near term-— vote winning tax cuts over the near term. the chancellor has indicated _ near term. the chancellor has indicated he _ near term. the chancellor has indicated he will _ near term. the chancellor has indicated he will cut _ near term. the chancellor has indicated he will cut public-
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indicated he will cut public spending to deliver tax cuts. they wouldn't comment further, for example, following this warning from the iss. at the iss is saying the case is very weak unless the treasury is to demonstrate very detailed numbers on how they will balance things. —— ifs. it is not likely in this budget, next week, is it? balor no, not in this budget and that really is the problem. == this budget and that really is the problem.— this budget and that really is the problem. -- no, not in this budaet. the problem. -- no, not in this budget- in _ the problem. -- no, not in this budget. in one _ the problem. -- no, not in this budget. in one way _ the problem. -- no, not in this budget. in one way they - the problem. -- no, not in this budget. in one way they have l budget. in one way they have pointed towards us and say you have to provide us with details but on the other side they are also saying that generally some of those other plans they have laid out in the past in terms of potential cuts to spending don't actually come to fruition so there is a weak case in terms of this idea that those cuts were actually going to give them the benefit that they have laid out. of course we've seen a track record from the conservatives in the past under liz truss ratio of cost
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announced this big spending package but the underlying message as to how it was to be funded, that raised the cost of borrowing and really undid the work she was doing in the first place so really there are other question marks about how it will take a relatively unfunded raft of tax cuts this time around. raft of tax cuts this time around-— raft of tax cuts this time around. g , ., ., ~ ,, around. 0k, joshua, thank you very much- _ around. 0k, joshua, thank you very much. good _ around. 0k, joshua, thank you very much. good to _ around. 0k, joshua, thank you very much. good to get - around. 0k, joshua, thank you very much. good to get your . very much. good to get your take on that. joshua mahony from scope markets. let's return to boeing. a new report from the us government raises fresh concerns over boeing's safety management systems. citing a disconnect between senior management and regular staff, and signs that safety—related messages and behaviours were not effectively put in place across the company. this raises another red flag for the plane making giant under mounting scrutiny after a section of one of its passengerjets blew off in mid—air last month.
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for more on this i'm joined now by airline analyst john strickland from jls consulting. hello to you, john. it seems, john, we getting report after report at the moment that there warning about safety at boeing? it is interesting to note this report was actually under preparation before the recent incident with the dog coming off the aircraft. it was really put into place following two fatal crashes, 2018 and 2019. what you mentioned there about the disconnect between management and workforce is a key element because boeing moved out of its factory operation in seattle to chicago and even further east to washington. there was a logic to that in terms of the access to that in terms of the access to wall street and access to government, but, the actual need to be down on the shop floor and speaking to workers i think is a really important point. manufacturing really needs to have a dialogue and
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awareness between top management, what is going on in a day—to—day basis which has four workers even informal conversations to speak with management and that is something the supporters highlighted.— something the supporters highlighted. something the supporters hiuuhlihted. ., highlighted. dave calhoon, the ceo of boeing, _ highlighted. dave calhoon, the ceo of boeing, has _ highlighted. dave calhoon, the ceo of boeing, has been - highlighted. dave calhoon, the ceo of boeing, has been very i ceo of boeing, has been very robust in saying we are looking at safety and dealing but this does make each report is chipping away and people actually question —— questioning whether they want tojump on a boeing plane or not —— dave calhoun. this tojump on a boeing plane or not -- dave calhoun. this has been going — not -- dave calhoun. this has been going on _ not -- dave calhoun. this has been going on for— not -- dave calhoun. this has been going on for a _ not -- dave calhoun. this has been going on for a long - not -- dave calhoun. this has| been going on for a long time, challenges the quality control. the boss of ryanair... each —— ryanair has put its own engineers into the factories in seattle to oversee production of this newly delivered aircraft. just in the last few days boeing announced a management reorganisation in
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this commercial aeroplanes. part of the business, including the departure of the man who had headed up the 737 programme, an 18 year veteran of boeing. so we are moving people out of the chessboard, so to speak, but we have to see whether that delivers results that will be a long process. these fatal crashes, absolutely shocking incident with alaska airlines, it will take a long time to overcome in terms of reputation but boeing has to get to that pre—eminent position when it was known as a manufacturer with good engineering stature —— engineering stature —— engineering standards and quality control and that sort of thing. to quality control and that sort of thin. ., i. quality control and that sort of thin. ., ,, ., ~ of thing. to get your take, john strickland _ of thing. to get your take, john strickland from - of thing. to get your take, john strickland from jls i john strickland from jls consulting. to japan now, where the latest inflation numbers show price rises slowing for the third month in a row
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let's get some of the day's other news now. —— the rate of food price rises has eased in the uk to a near two—year low in february. figures from the british retail consortium show annual food inflation slowing to 5% in february — down from 6.1% injanuary. the brc said the slowdown was driven by easing energy and fertiliser costs and retailer competition. microsoft has signed a new partnership with french start—up mistral ai. the deal is part of the tech giant's strategy to expand its footprint in the artificial intelligence industry. it will also give microsoft access to a new customer base and allow for mistral�*s large language models to be available on microsoft's azure cloud computing platform. the leading crypto currency bitcoin has hit a two—year high in asia trading — going above $57,000 for a token. the world's most well—known cryptocurrency has seen a pick up in trade since the us financial watchdog, the sec, approved bitcoin to be part of mainstream investing funds last month. bitcoin was worth nearly $70,000 a token at its peak in 2021.
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to women in the workplace now, and signs that at the very top management level women's representation is improving here in the uk. but a step—change is still needed by some companies to deliver gender balance. that's according to a new report from the ftse women leaders review. it says just over half of ftse 350 companies have achieved — or are well on their way to achieving gender balance but others have work to do. let's discuss this with denise wilson — chief executive of the ftse women leaders — who are behind the report. it sounds like good news and bad news. talk us through it. the report measures two different levels women in boards and management level and women in boards met the 40%
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target last year, three years ahead of the deadline, and this year we have seen an increase to 42% women on board showing greater progress to come under gains on their way. women in leadership, it is, well over half of ftse 350 companies have already met the 40% target gender balance in their leadership teams, that is roughly the top 80— 100 roles in a public listed company but the other half, a smaller half, and still got away to that and it is those companies we are urging today to double down on their efforts. d0 urging today to double down on their efforts.— their efforts. do you think that this _ their efforts. do you think that this is _ their efforts. do you think that this is proof - their efforts. do you think that this is proof or - their efforts. do you think. that this is proof or evidence to show that we didn't need legally binding quotas that
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actually set a link —— setting the targets, increasing transparency is getting the job done? transparency is getting the 'ob done? ~,,. , transparency is getting the 'ob done? ~ , ., done? absolutely. voting legislation _ done? absolutely. voting legislation or _ done? absolutely. voting legislation or voluntary i legislation or voluntary targets which the uk is a which is the route the uk has chosen to take, and it has been a raging —— raging debate for a decade. and i think this has proved that one or two targets can work and business, or stakeholder effort and it has taken a complex stakeholder group to bring this about and can bring legal change was not having adopted a route have worked very hard in terms of a compliance regime which most other european companies have adopted to understand the complex and compounding barriers that women face in the work place and how to address them. we haven't dressed the tougher ones but there is still a way to go, more work to be done. i think no—one will doubt that, more work to be done in the very top roles as well.
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what are the key—if you were to say what the key things managers can do, bosses can do, ceos can do, to enable women to climb to the top, what would it be? . ., , ., be? organisations need to collect the _ be? organisations need to collect the data, _ be? organisations need to collect the data, need - be? organisations need to collect the data, need to l collect the data, need to understand where they are, set reasonable targets, achievable target in achievable deadlines. they need to lift the lid on every single people process within their organisation and route out bias and they need to make sure that opportunities are available for men and women. the appointment rate, this year we have seen the appointment rate deep in the ftse 250 with almost seven out of ten roles in the ftse 250, available roles during last year, going infavour of available roles during last year, going in favour of men. 0k. year, going in favour of men. ok. ~ ., ., , ., ok. we need to do better than that. 0k, _ ok. we need to do better than that. ok, denise— ok. we need to do better than that. ok, denise thank- ok. we need to do better than that. ok, denise thank you - ok. we need to do better than l that. ok, denise thank you very much. denise _ that. ok, denise thank you very much. denise wilson, _ that. ok, denise thank you very much. denise wilson, leader. that. ok, denise thank you very much. denise wilson, leader of| much. denise wilson, leader of the ftse women leaders review.
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around the world and across the uk. this is bbc news. bbc news, bringing you different stories from across the uk. 1, . ~ different stories from across the uk. i, . ~ ., ., the uk. back to training in middlesborough. - the uk. back to training in middlesborough. les - the uk. back to training in middlesborough. les is i the uk. back to training in i middlesborough. les is already thinking about his next bout after taking the welterweight belt at the regional unity fighting championship in darlington. —— elias. fighting championship in darlington. -- elias. every day training. _ darlington. -- elias. every day training, even _ darlington. -- elias. every day training, even after— darlington. -- elias. every day training, even after the - darlington. -- elias. every day training, even after the fight, l training, even after the fight, straight — training, even after the fight, straight in after two days. obviously at this amateur level. _ obviously at this amateur level, you can keep going as much — level, you can keep going as much as_ level, you can keep going as much as you can and not many injuries — much as you can and not many injuries if_ much as you can and not many injuries. if you get injury, you — injuries. if you get injury, you can _ injuries. if you get injury, you can take time off and you tet you can take time off and you get injured more but you can keep— get injured more but you can keep going. get injured more but you can keep going-— get injured more but you can keep going. ilyas's crowd that has been supporting - keep going. ilyas's crowd that has been supporting him i keep going. ilyas's crowd that| has been supporting him since he started at 11t. has been supporting him since he started at m. we has been supporting him since he started at 14.— he started at 14. we are very roud he started at 14. we are very proud and — he started at 14. we are very proud and working _ he started at 14. we are very proud and working hard i he started at 14. we are very proud and working hard to i he started at 14. we are very. proud and working hard to get this into the sky is the limit now. we have got one title there and another title lined up there and another title lined up at the end of march there. and another one injune as well. and another one in june as well. �* ., , ., , ., ,
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well. after that, ilyas and his team have — well. after that, ilyas and his team have his— well. after that, ilyas and his team have his sights - well. after that, ilyas and his team have his sights set i well. after that, ilyas and his team have his sights set on l well. after that, ilyas and his l team have his sights set on the american circuit. for team have his sights set on the american circuit.— american circuit. for more stories from _ american circuit. for more stories from across - american circuit. for more stories from across the i american circuit. for more| stories from across the uk, head to the bbc news website. you're live with bbc news. i'm sally bundock and let's continue with the agenda and bringing more of the gender balance. and to australia now where the gender pay gap for every large private sector employer has been publicly released for the first time today. showing that male employees earn around 22% more than their female colleagues. the minister for women said the data will arm individuals with the evidence needed to speed up closing the gap. from sydney, here's phil mercer. australia prides itself on its egalitarian spirit but the difference in pay between men and women is a stubborn problem for every $1 males own, women
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and is... ~ , ., for every $1 males own, women and is... ~ ., for every $1 males own, women and is- - -— and is... when you look at the fiture it and is... when you look at the figure it is _ and is... when you look at the figure it is almost _ and is... when you look at the figure it is almost like - and is... when you look at the figure it is almost like there i figure it is almost like there is a message out there, you are not good enough, yet. at the heart of it is the undervaluation of women's work. in sydney it divides opinion. a lot of companies they are more men and the boys club so it is pretty hard for women to break in and get promoted and it is not easy for women.- in and get promoted and it is not easy for women. yes, it is a very blokey _ not easy for women. yes, it is a very blokey society - not easy for women. yes, it is a very blokey society in i not easy for women. yes, it is a very blokey society in many| a very blokey society in many ways — a very blokey society in many ways but _ a very blokey society in many ways but it has also changed dramatically over the years. | dramatically over the years. don't dramatically over the years. i don't think it is as much of an issue — don't think it is as much of an issue anymore. _ don't think it is as much of an issue anymore.— don't think it is as much of an issue anymore. various factors in australia _ issue anymore. various factors in australia limit _ issue anymore. various factors in australia limit is _ issue anymore. various factors in australia limit is jet -- i in australia limit is jet —— limit capacity for women to earn in dominated industries in teaching and nurturing have attracted lower wages. women taking time out of the workforce to look after children and then there is discrimination but things are changing. discrimination but things are chanttin. , changing. gender pay differences, - changing. gender pay differences, at i changing. gender pay differences, at an i differences, at an international engineering and its construction company are just above the australian average but there is a
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concerted effort to bring about change. concerted effort to bring about chante. . , concerted effort to bring about chante. ., , , change. personally it has been ttettin change. personally it has been getting more _ change. personally it has been getting more women - change. personally it has been getting more women into i getting more women into leadership roles so recognising talent. — leadership roles so recognising talent, developing them and putting — talent, developing them and putting them into senior roles. the other— putting them into senior roles. the other thing has been really analysing our data so we really need _ analysing our data so we really need to — analysing our data so we really need to understand whether we have _ need to understand whether we have bias — need to understand whether we have bias. ., , have bias. new laws require every australian _ have bias. new laws require every australian business i have bias. new laws requirej every australian business to publish their gender pay data. but will transparency or naming and shaming those who perform badly make any difference? fin badly make any difference? on the one side there is the sunlight is the best disinfectant and this will hold people to account. it is used as a gotcha thing for politicians and others to get quicker sound then i think it won't be all that helpful while there is progress it is slow. many people working today will
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have long retired before the pay gap between men and women in australia is closed. staying in the workplace, and the growing issue of absences. here in the uk, the level of people off work due to sickness has been flagged as having a drag on the economy and businesses. according to new research, over 100 million sick days were taken last year by people with long—term health conditions. the research reveals the majority of employers are not offering workers the support needed to get sick staff back to work. the study was carried out by the centre for economics and business research alongside the insurers zurich. zurich's head of market engagement, peter hamilton, joins me now. good morning to you, peter. looking at your report, it says that sickness, people on long—term sickness could cost the economy over 66 billion
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pounds by 2030. that is a huge amount of money. it is pounds by 2030. that is a huge amount of money.— amount of money. it is huge. you are right _ amount of money. it is huge. you are right if _ amount of money. it is huge. you are right if you _ amount of money. it is huge. you are right if you look i amount of money. it is huge. you are right if you look at i you are right if you look at last you's figure it was 32 billion and had increased the previous three years but you can see if it would carry on at the same rate of growth now it is going to be up by 60 billion so it is not great for the individual employee who is off work but for his or her family, it is not good for the employer who is going to have to cope with that sort of disruption and as the figure shows clearly not good for the economy either. i5 not good for the economy either. , . , not good for the economy either. , , ., . either. is anything in research to say that — either. is anything in research to say that this _ either. is anything in research to say that this is _ either. is anything in research to say that this is anything i either. is anything in research to say that this is anything to | to say that this is anything to do with covid, because there has been a significant increase in people on long—term sick leave? in people on long-term sick leave? ., ., , ., leave? that would be a component _ leave? that would be a component part - leave? that would be a component part of- leave? that would be a component part of it, l leave? that would be a j component part of it, it leave? that would be a i component part of it, it would be the only reason. certainly there is a covert hangover and we will see people suffering from long covid and extended periods of absence from work. there are some other issues as well stop they expressed concerns about the nhs and the funding crisis and the
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challenges there having an impact, too. also things like moving to work from home will have an impact because one of the larger reasons for people being off sick for so long is things like musculoskeletal problems so we see people probably having setups in their home working environment which aren't ideal either. we probably... aren't ideal either. we probably. . ._ aren't ideal either. we probably. . . probably... going forward clearly this _ probably... going forward clearly this is _ probably... going forward clearly this is something l probably... going forward l clearly this is something we need to focus on. i know the government has been focusing on this for some time and when a —— whenever the labour figures come out, people and their various measures and policies people are putting out to get people are putting out to get people back in the workplace but it says here in the research that only one third of the workers who were off because of sickness were offered employer support. i find it amazing, only a third. 0nly find it amazing, only a third. only a specific kind of support we are referring to. i think the workplace is a really important place to look at rehabilitation for individuals looking to get back to work
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because there are so many interventions that the employer can make it up increasingly, and this is good news, i think we are seeing employers focusing more on the health of their employees and they are looking at keeping people healthy in the first place, so preventative measures, looking to keep them safe and healthy. but what's —— once individuals are off work it is important to find ways to get them back into work quickly. we know from the other research we have done that's the quicker someone gets back to work, the less likely it is for them to be off for any material period of time thereafter. but that early intervention is really critical so we do know that when people have got access to what we call vocational rehabilitation which is, well, it could be, for example, physiotherapy, it could be mental health counselling, it could be looking specifically at condition cancer, for example, where you have different
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pathways, you can find whence ways of getting people back into work so we know that nine out of ten people get back into jobs and we also know three out of ten who don't have access to that a local employer based for traditional rehabilitation. so employer rehabilitation, does that kind of replace or fill the void or the gaps that are in the nhs at the moment? it would be complimentary, too. i think one of the challenges for the nhs, for example, isjust the nhs, for example, isjust the waiting lists. employer rehabilitation which can be provided insurers but not exclusively, well for example provides that physiotherapy stop in practice you can go to the nhs but you are unlikely to be on a particularly long queue to get access to it so it is advancing the ability to get back to work. do advancing the ability to get back to work.— advancing the ability to get back to work. , ., ~ , back to work. do you think this re ort, back to work. do you think this report. if— back to work. do you think this report. if this _ back to work. do you think this report, if this trend _ back to work. do you think this report, if this trend continues l report, if this trend continues and actually, i was listening to a programme on bbc radio 4 just yesterday which was looking at the issue going forward in the years to come of
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obesity and how that will impact the economy, the cost of the nhs etc and work. is this a case, i know this is your business so you probably said it is a case, for private medical insurance provided by employers going forward? it would certainly make the case. as far as employers are concerned, it is giving them that extra option stop it is notjust that extra option stop it is not just about rehabilitation but it is also about the preventative peace in the first place. there is a company in japan who announce very recently that they were exchanging —— exchanging financial bonuses or work performance for the number of miles you ran. so here isjust one example of fitness in the workplace and i'm not sure short —— necessarily capture on here but the idea that you look to keep people healthy in the workplace in the first place is really important and that ability to quickly intervene when people are off sick is really important, too.- when people are off sick is really important, too. ok, it is a really —
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really important, too. ok, it is a really interesting - is a really interesting subject. peter hamilton, head of marketing engagement at zurich, we appreciate that. thank you. let's talk about japan. the latest inflation numbers are out showing price rises slowed for the third month in a row to 2% injanuary. this hits the central bank's target number, raising questions over if and whenjapan will move away from its negative interest rate policy. let's discuss this with professor richard weiner for the —— from the university of winchester business school. good morning to you, richard. just explain because many for us watching surely in the uk think that this is good news, they have hit 2%, they are on target, happy days. but explain why this is more of a challenge injapan. why this is more of a challenge in jaan. , . why this is more of a challenge injaan. , ., why this is more of a challenge injaan. . ., .,, ., ., in japan. japan has had a difficult time _ in japan. japan has had a difficult time and - in japan. japan has had aj difficult time and (audio breaks up), for the last 20 years, most of the time, until
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2017- 2018, the years, most of the time, until 2017— 2018, the problem has been deflation stop they have been deflation stop they have been working hard to end deflation, it has been falling and falling and falling and that means sales are going down, company are going bankrupt, (audio breaks up). and the central bank's main job was to create —— it has recently exceeded and (audio breaks up). recently exceeded and (audio breaks up)-_ recently exceeded and (audio breaks up). richard, sadly the audio connection _ breaks up). richard, sadly the audio connection with _ breaks up). richard, sadly the audio connection with you i breaks up). richard, sadly the audio connection with you is i audio connection with you is not very strong at all. we will try and talk to richard maybe a little later in and pick his brains about that. but what is happening injapan, as he was explaining, is this increase in confidence that the economy is not robust —— is it robust enough or not for the central back to exit from negative interest rates? that is a dilemma facing japan's central bank and the latest inflation numbers out today showing it is
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2% in the month of january. interestingly, if we look at financial markets in asia, the japanese interestingly, if we look at financial markets in asia, the japanese markets interestingly, if we look at financial markets in asia, the japanese markets are interestingly, if we look at financial markets in asia, the japanese markets are booming right now. once again, new record highs for the nikkei 225 but a lot of this is due to the fact that the japanese yen has been extremely weak of late. rd of course enables a lot of japanese exports to be cheaper and more favourable, boosting the profits of many companies listed on the nikkei. but also there is not a lot —— there is also a lot of ai take listed on the nikkei as well which is very much in favour and causing markets to go up and up. you are up—to—date on all things business. thank you for your company. have a really good today. i will see you soon. hello, there. it does look like the rest of this week will remain very changeable. things are set to turn a bit more unsettled now for the next few days. we've got this first frontal system, one of many, pushing its way southwards
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and eastwards during the course of tuesday. so a wet and windy start across scotland, northern ireland, some snow on the hills briefly. england and wales starts cold and frosty, some mist and fog, some early brightness, but the cloud will build as this front pushes southwards and eastwards. as it weakens, there will be barely anything on it. but brightening up for scotland and northern ireland through the afternoon, with sunny spells, scattered, blustery showers, these wintry on the hills. winds will be quite a feature in the north and the west, lighter winds further south and east, so we've lost that cold, raw feel that we had on monday across southern and eastern areas. temperature—wise, i think around 6 to 9 celsius. now, as we head through tuesday night, that weather front clears away from southern areas. it turns drier with clearer skies, light winds, so another chilly night to come, across central and eastern areas. but the next frontal system will be working to the west later on. but a chilly start to wednesday, some areas of frost and fog likely.
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but for the middle part of the week, things will turn a bit milder across the whole country, but wetter and windier with it. now, the milder air will be in this wedge between the warm and the cold front, but it will bring stronger winds and outbreaks of rain as it pushes across the country during the course of wednesday. so this is how wednesday starts — chilly, early brightness, a bit of mist and fog. the clouds build up, the rain and the wind splash their way northwards and eastward through the course of the day, with those temperatures beginning to lift somewhat, particularly across southern and western areas. so we're looking at around 10 to maybe 13 degrees for wednesday afternoon. it doesn't last, though, because cooler air will be moving in behind this area of low pressure. thursday, the last day of february, looks unsettled, very blustery across the northern half of the country. weather fronts across england and wales will bring outbreaks of rain. scotland and northern ireland seeing the brightest of the conditions, with lots of showers here, but they will be turning increasingly wintry as things
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turn cooler in the north and the west, the last of the double figures across the southeast, and then as we head into the first four days of march, things remain unsettled with low pressure nearby. we'll see showers or longer spells of rain, there will be some sunshine around, but it will be chilly both by day and by night.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today.
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the former chairman of the post office — sacked in a bitter row over compensation for wrongly convicted sub—postmasters — speaks in public for the first time. biden says a ceasefire between israel and hamas could be reached by the start of next week. my national security adviser tells me that we're close. were close — we're not done yet. my hope is by next monday we'll have a ceasefire. calls for delivery drivers to be given greater protection on their rounds in the face of a rise in threats and violence against them. i'll look at the impact on the drivers and their families. the fa cup dream is over for maidstone, but the celebrations to mark their memorable run to the fifth round continued well after the final whistle after losing to coventry last night. after the final whistle after losing it after the final whistle after losing is 100 days until anniversary it is 100 days until the 80th anniversary of d—day. commemorations will take place in northern france,
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